Certification action changes

The powers to be want to change the haulers training

I suggest you read and send your comments to reject the trucks drivers needing to be certified organic   a real dumb move in MY opinion

PLEASE READ BELOW.  THE NOSB IS RECOMMENDING THAT ALL HAULERS OF BULK GRAIN BE CERTIFIED.  THIS MEANS ALL TRUCKING COMPANIES AND RAIL COMPANIES HAULING BULK GRAIN WILL BE REQUIRED TO BE CERTIFIED.  THIS WILL HAVE A MAJOR AFFECT ON MOVING ORGANIC GRAIN AROUND THE COUNTRY AND THE WORLD.  PLEASE READ, COMMENT TO THE NOSB, AND PASS ON TO OTHER ORGANIC ADVOCATES

 

Public Comment Period Open for Guidance on Bulk Organic Products

One issue that may have a significant impact on some CCOF members is a new National Organic Program (NOP) Draft Guidance, published February 3, regarding handling bulk, unpackaged organic products. We encourage members to read the draft guidance and provide comments to the USDA.

   

The draft guidance specifies that handlers of bulk organic products, including grain, soybeans, hay, milk, and livestock must be certified or covered under another operation’s organic certification. Consistent with current regulations, packaged organic products do not need handler certification. “Handling and storing boxes of packaged organic granola bars is very different from handling bulk commodities,” said Miles McEvoy, Deputy Administrator for the NOP, in a prepared statement. “The draft guidance demonstrates how organic integrity is maintained from farm to market.”

 

View the draft guidance and instructions for submitting comments. Comments are due by April 3, 2012. Final Guidance on this issue will be incorporated into the NOP Program Handbook, which provides guidance on complying with organic regulations.

 

Food supply chair is strong on Organic acres, problems loom in Industruial Ag acrs

Weather or Not?
Posted on March 16, 2012 by John Bunting
Share

National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration’s (NOAA) has released information on its projections for the spring, which seems to be a month early here. Weather.com has compiled much of the information into one article.

Who knows what will actually happen but, if the projections are correct, milk production might be off for a long time because of temperature related complications. While it is possible to suck up water from the time of dinosaurs, air conditioning presents another problem.

A significant part of consolidation in dairy or any other complex system is the loss of resilience. Will dairy be able to spring back if the weather in 2012 becomes difficult? Certainly, dairy is less able to meet the challenge which nature has long been willing to provide.

There are some, not many, who expect the second half of 2012 to bring $30 milk. There will be a large number of operations leaving before we see $30/cwt. Banks, will be less willing to help.

If anyone is waiting for Wal$Mart shoppers to become concerned, keep in mind that more than half of Americans now work in offices…that is to say they are isolated from not only the weather, but also, much of reality.